FAQ

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  • 1.FAQ - Le Droit Humain
  • What is Freemasonry, in a nutshell?

    patrick09-03-2014

    Freemasonry is an initiatory system containing the keys to the ancient mysteries, which are experienced through a series of mystery dramas designed to open up and deepen awareness and understanding.

    You can find more on the details here: http://www.droit-humain.org/en/index.php?seccion=5

  • Are freemasons above the law?

    Albert Cowan29-06-2013

    Freemasons are under the same civil laws as ll citizens, and they apply stringent criteria to themselves than the law demands.

    Thus, one found guilty of a crime does no longer meet the requirements of good character, whether or not an official internal inquiry has been held.
    By breaking the civil law, in ways that condemn them to more than a fine, a Freemason is no longer Free, and thus no longer a Mason.

    In any case, trying to protect an offender, shelter them from prosecution, hide their guilt, swipe a registered judgement under the carpet, or to demand such unmasonic behaviors to be carried out by others, is in itself unmasonic.

  • Is Freemasonry a cult?

    Albert Cowan24-06-2013

    No, but any cult would say that.

    First, let's clarify how the world "cult" and "sect" can have multiple usages: mainstream religious cult and philosophical sects made of follower of the likes of Plato, are not what this question is addressed at.
    The question refers to some form of organization that submits members' wills and bodies, separate them from their families and friends, oppress them and extracts large amounts of money, and/or have obscure and dangerous aims. The judging criteria are not the ideological beliefs but the actions and behaviors that violate the rights, dignity and freedom of the human person.

    And often members of a religious or political organization will call "a cult" any organization that they disagree with.

    So in order to answer the question objectively, we have to address some objective criteria laid out by a recognized body. We can take the criteria of the French association of defense of individuals and families: http://www.unadfi.org/caracteristiques-des-sectes-selon (translated and summarized here):

    To describe a group of "cult", we retain the criterion of harmfulness or extremely dangerous group by the combination of three characteristics:

    • Mental manipulation
      • Indoctrination
      • Mind Control
      • Feeding dependency
      • Pressures
    • Triple destruction
      • Destruction of the person
        (physically, weaken the body; psychological, weaken critical mind; intellectual, reduce the field and sources of knowledge; relational, reduce social skills and contacts; social, withdraw from society)
      • Destruction of the family
        (breakup relationships, undermine authority, estrange from children, recruit children)
      • Destruction of society
        (infiltrate institutions, or desert them, reject legal authority, turn anyone external to an enemy, prevent involvement as a citizen, remove from cultural and social activities)
    • Triple scam
      • Intellectual
        (You never get what was promised, it is always postponed and everyone else is blamed for the failure to deliver. Members first of all)
      • Moral
        (Members usually become victim of all sorts of abuses, and have lost the will to even see that they are victims)
      • Financial
        (The bigger red flag of them all is the money aspect. If you spend more than 1% of your disposable income you have to start to worry; more than 10% there is no doubt about the cultish nature of the organization)

    The FAQ's address the main criteria: unreasonable financial demands, negative impact on trust and relationship with family and friends, social and intellectual submission.

    In a nut shell, it is a very strong principle of Freemasonry that members have to strike a balance in their lives between their professional life, their private life, their social obligations and their rest.

    Freemasonry should not cost members more time or money than any social club they may belong to, like an acting society for instance.
    And if they decide to take on more responsibilities, for instance becoming a treasurer, they are requires to inspect their own conscience to decide if that extra time commitment is compatible with their other obligations; and they are encouraged to discuss with their family how this will impact their free time.

    In Freemasonry, the ultimate priority is the Freemason's happiness and balance. And their family should always be included in making big decisions when joining or when progressing.

  • Are freemasons worshipping the devil?

    Albert Cowan27-05-2013

    No.

    Freemasonry is not a worship.

    We do not worship any entity. And any worship, under any name, which is offensive to our humanistic values is not compatible with Freemasonry.

  • Is Le Droit Humain the only "real" Freemasonry order in Ireland?

    Albert Cowan27-05-2013

    No.

    There are more than one order of Freemasonry in Ireland, and Le Droit Humain is the latest addition.

    Some others orders may or may not recognize us as "real" or "valid" or "fraternal", they may see our order as being out of order and "irregular". They would not allow their members to visit us, or allow our members to visit them. That is likely to be the case, for instance, of orders that do not accept women in their midst

    Some may recognize us in spite of our divergences on some points.

    We think that openness and fraternal relationships are more important than organizational structures, national boundaries or unjustified prejudices. We are open to discuss with members of all the orders who share the common grounds of Freemasonry, whether they desire to be members of our order or not.

    Also, because we are an international order, we work closely with our Sisters and Brethren in other countries.

    We aim at practising an authentic Freemasonry, without casting doubts on how "real" other practices are. They are just not our practices. They are only one of the paths to the truth, the one we have chosen.

     

    [notice]Edit February 2014:
    A handful of former members of our Pioneer Lodge decided, after their expulsion, to create their own order independent of Le Droit Humain, using the name of our Pioneer Lodge Elizabeth St Leger, and backdating their decision to January 2014.

    They have no connection to Pioneer Lodge Elizabeth St Leger or Le Droit Humain.

    [/notice]

  • How much does it cost to join Freemasonry?

    Albert Cowan24-05-2013

    The cost of joining the Order is associated with the cost of running it.
    The total cost will depend on each lodge, but it should never exceed what you would be ready to pay for joining a club (a choir, a theater group, a sports club or a gym).

    There is a once-off joining fee when joining a lodge.
    There is then an annual fee, to be paid every year.
    There is a fee associated with each ceremony linked to masonic degrees.
    None of these fees would exceed a 2 figure number.

    Then you can expect costs related to charitable activities, but again they should never stretch to anything that would be unreasonable for any other voluntary activities or hobbies.

    Members are invited to not contribute above their means, and as a guideline, to not volunteer further sums that would exceed what they would give a charity or their church if they contribute to such bodies.
    The value of members is not indexed to their financial contribution.

    A good guideline is that if your expenses on any voluntary activity is over 1% of your disposable income, you should start to look closer and start thinking about cutting back.

    The most precious contribution will more likely be the time you invest, as long as that time does not interfere with other social obligations, especially family and work obligations.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... an atheist?

    Albert Cowan21-05-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.

    The reference to the "Great Architect of the Universe" (formerly the "Supreme Being" found in the French Constitution) does not necessitate the belief in a personal deity or in any deity. It does not contradict such as belief either, but it does not imply it.

    The "Great Architect of the Universe" can of course be understood to be the god(s) of any religion our members may adhere to. But it can also be "science" or "human consciousnesses", etc..

    For Freemasons, the concept of "Great Architect of the Universe" is an organizing principle rather than a dogmatic belief. Freemasonry does not offer dogmas.

  • Will a judge show leniency to me if we are both freemasons?

    Albert Cowan27-04-2013

    A judge should be impartial, and Freemasons should be law abiding.

    So your membership as a Freemason would not tilt the balance of Justice one way or the other. But if it did (it won't), it should be in the sense of more severity.

    If you are committing a crime in civil law, you have most certainly already breach your duty as a Freemason: you should not expect any help with civil proceeding, and rather expect further disciplinary action from your sisters and brethren.

    Freemasonry is not a free pass for anything.
    If anything it is more demanding of its members because of their commitment to the truth and to self-improvement for the benefit of humanity.

  • Does Freemasonry support a political party?

    Albert Cowan28-03-2013

    No.

    Freemasonry is not political.

    It expects its members to form and keep their own political convictions, and it does not permit discussion on political matters at Masonic meetings and gatherings.

    Traditionally, some orders may be, in some countries, identified with some political wings or parties.
    But the reality is that members of all parties may belong to any of the orders so "identified".

    It is only natural that more conservative orders may attract more people for more conservative parties, that more liberal orders may attract more people for more liberal parties, that more progressive orders may attract more people for more progressive parties. But it is just coincidental.

    As long as someone shares the humanistic values of Freemasonry, there is no reason to exclude them (or include them) on political grounds.

    Historically, some authoritarian regimes may have banned Freemasonry, but that can only be seen as a good sign.

  • Is Freemasonry a religion?

    Albert Cowan28-03-2013

    No.

    Freemasonry is not a religion, or a combination of religions, nor is it a substitute for religion. It expects its members to adhere to their own faith, and it does not permit discussion on religious matters at Masonic meetings and gatherings, other than to augment their understanding of humanity in a fraternal atmosphere of sharing and understanding.

  • What are the advantages or privileges of being a freemason?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    None other than fraternally working towards improving yourself, be of service to your fellow women and men, and search for the truth.

    There are no financial incentive in being a member. It will not give you a job, a business advantage, or help you escape the law.

  • Is Le Droit Humain recognized by other masonic orders?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    Le Droit Humain is in fraternal relations with a number of masonic orders (meaning recognition is reciprocal and members can intervisit).

    Le Droit Humain recognises a number of masonic orders (but is not reciprocally recognized by them as a regular masonic order.)

    If you belong to a masonic order:

    • Ask your order if you want to know if you are allowed by them to go and visit us
    • Ask us if you want to know if you are allowed to come and visit us

    We might welcome visitors whose order does not recognize us, but we do not encourage Freemasons to defy the orders they are members of.

  • What is the highest "level" or "degrees" of Freemasonry? Is it 3? or 33? or 34?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    This point is often misunderstood included by Freemasons themselves.

    The highest degree in Freemasonry is the 3rd: Master Mason

    There is no "higher" level than the 3rd. It is the degree needed to take part in masonic work, for instance chairing a lodge meeting.

    A Master Mason is as high as you can get as a Freemason, after having been initiated as an Entered Apprentice, and then trained as a Fellow Craft.

    There is no need or obligation for any Freemason to go any further if they do not so wish. It does not make them lesser Freemasons.

    Further degrees

    Some orders, like ours, offer a path that consists of further degrees.

    They are not "higher" than the third degree, but they can be seen as "further" or "deeper".

    We "work" the "Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite" from the 1st to the 33rd degree.

    Other orders may have another degree structure.

  • Is Freemasonry a secret organization?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    No. It is an organization with secrets.

    It is not a "secret society" with nefarious aims or criminal activities, covered by a coded language.

    But it is an organization that needed, at a time in its history, to be discrete. This required some signs to recognize people that could be trusted, at a time when sharing ideas and crossing "party lines" (in term of politics or religion) freely was condemnable.

    These signs, rituals and other codes remain, but they are not the true "secrets" of Freemasonry. They are widely available on the Internet, and are only external representations of the facts that some of our teachings are not communicable in any other ways but in experiencing them.

    Freemasonry is a pathway of initiation, free from dogma, inspired by the search for truth and an understanding of human consciousness – a science of the spirit. Masonic ritual and symbolism are the tools Freemasons use on that journey, whether this is their personal spiritual path towards the perfection of mankind; to liberty, equality and fraternity – human rights, Le Droit Humain.

    The authentic secrets of an authentic Freemasonry cannot be communicated by words or signs: they are experienced in walking the initiatic path to truth.

  • Is membership a secret?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    No. And Yes...

    No, not for you

    No, it is not one of the "secret" of Freemasonry. You can reveal your membership to whom you want, when you want.

    It is even strongly encouraged that you let your family know. It is encouraged that you let your friends know. Because family and friends are the best counsel anyone can find.
    They can keep you in check and make sure that you do not let any activity in your life "take over"; that includes Freemasonry.
    They can also advise you when you are wondering if you should invest more time with Freemasonry, by taking more responsibilities, or if you are doing enough already as regards to your other social obligations.

    As for work, or religious groups you belong too, or other social clubs, it is up to you to decide whom to tell and when to tell them. And if someone is approaching you to ask about it, they may be interested, so feel free to share. But you are certainly not encouraged to "talk people into joining".

    Yes, for others

    Just like anything which relates to the intimate (e.g., religion, sexuality, spirituality, relationships, fantasies, dreams and hopes), there is a difference between "coming out" by yourself to people, and "being outed" by others.

    It is unacceptable to disclose someone's membership without their express and renewed consent.
    It is similar to the coming out/outing of gay people: it should not be a big deal to be "out", but it is never acceptable to "out" someone else.

  • What is Le Droit Human?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    The International Order of Freemasonry for men and women, Le Droit Humain, is worldwide. Membership is open to all adults, without distinction of gender, biological heritage or personal beliefs.

    Our Order is founded on the ancient teachings and traditions of Freemasonry.
    An Irish lodge has been in the process of being founded since 2012, as a pioneer triangle “Elizabeth Saint Leger” (Motto: As Above, So Below) in the honour of the first female Irish freemason.
    The Order was founded in 1893.

    The International Order of Freemasonry for men and women, Le Droit Humain, works to the glory of the Great Architect of the Universe and/or to the perfection of humanity. On an individual level, it strives ” to promote the progress of individual worth, without the imposition of dogma, or exacting the abandonment of cultural or religious ideas”. On a group level “it works to unite men and women who agree on a humanist spirituality whilst respecting individual and cultural differences”.

    Freemasonry is a pathway of initiation, free from dogma, inspired by the search for truth, an understanding of human consciousness – a science of the spirit. Masonic ritual and symbolism are the tools Freemasons use on that journey, whether this is their personal spiritual path towards the perfection of mankind; to liberty, equality and fraternity – human rights, Le Droit Humain.

    Le Droit Humain in the world: http://www.droit-humain.org/en/index.php?seccion=64

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... a woman?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    We know that good people can be of any gender: male, female, cis- or trans-.

    After all, before any central Freemason organization formed in Ireland, a woman was famously initiated in Cork: the Lady Freemason, Elizabeth Aldworth, born Elizabeth Saint Leger.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... "Colored"?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds. Especially not based on racist fantasies.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    First, the term "Colored" (or "Black", or "Negro", or "Asian", or "Caucasian", or other racial/ethnic/etc. terminologies) in itself is inherited from a tradition of discrimination based on invalid scientific concepts. For instance no one is "black". Some people's skin can be various shades of brown, pink, or other... but never "black". Why then use a word referring to something else than the actual color?
    This was very smartly addressed in the film Pleasantville.

    We welcome members of all cultural and biological backgrounds, without caring for the hue of the color of their skin, and without reference to cultural bias they may suffer due to the circumstances of their births.

    We are not color-blind: we see people's true colors, and that does not include the color of their skin.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... a politician?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    On the one hand, we do encourage our members to remain active on all the dimensions of their lives that enrich them, without trying to influence them in how they invest themselves. That includes their involvement in the life of the city.
    On the other hand, we promote mutual respect between brethren and with the rest of the world. So if your way to be political is promoting intolerance and discrimination, then you would probably not find membership to our order rewarding.

    In all cases, we do not promote any dogma over another, and topics and issues related to this area remain "at the doors" of our Order.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... religious?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    Freemasonry is not a religion, or a combination of religions, nor is it a substitute for religion. It expects its members to adhere to their own faith, and it does not permit discussion on religious matters at Masonic meetings and gatherings.

    On the one hand, we do encourage our members to remain active on all the dimensions of their lives that enrich them, without trying to influence them in how they invest themselves. That includes their faith/worship of choice.
    On the other hand, we promote mutual respect between sisters/brethren and with the rest of the world. So if your way to be religious is promoting intolerance and discrimination, then you would probably not find membership to our order rewarding.

    In all cases, we do not promote any dogma over another, and topics and issues related to this area remain "at the doors" of our Order.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... not well-off?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    The cost of being a Freemason is similar to the cost of belonging to any club or organization.
    It would not cost more, or less, than belonging to an acting club or to a sports club, or to a gym.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... gay?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    Without entering in the debate of knowing if sexual orientation is the result of a nature or of a choice, or a combination of both, we can serenely claim that it does not matter.
    We only care about what someone does to become a better person, and sexuality in itself does not predetermine the ability to be a good person.

  • Who can join freemasonry?

    Albert Cowan24-03-2013

    Anyone who is an adult of good character, and fosters a desire to be useful to their fellow men and women.

  • This site is under construction

    patrick24-03-2013

    The International Order of Freemasonry for men and women, Le Droit Humain, is worldwide.

    Membership is open to all adults, without distinction of gender, biological or cultural heritage, or personal beliefs.

    For information: contact@freemasonsireland.org

    Le Droit Humain in the world: http://www.droit-humain.org/en/index.php?seccion=64

    [Spider_FAQ id="1"]

  • 2.FAQ - Le Droit Humain
  • What is Freemasonry, in a nutshell?

    patrick09-03-2014

    Freemasonry is an initiatory system containing the keys to the ancient mysteries, which are experienced through a series of mystery dramas designed to open up and deepen awareness and understanding.

    You can find more on the details here: http://www.droit-humain.org/en/index.php?seccion=5

  • Is Le Droit Humain the only "real" Freemasonry order in Ireland?

    Albert Cowan27-05-2013

    No.

    There are more than one order of Freemasonry in Ireland, and Le Droit Humain is the latest addition.

    Some others orders may or may not recognize us as "real" or "valid" or "fraternal", they may see our order as being out of order and "irregular". They would not allow their members to visit us, or allow our members to visit them. That is likely to be the case, for instance, of orders that do not accept women in their midst

    Some may recognize us in spite of our divergences on some points.

    We think that openness and fraternal relationships are more important than organizational structures, national boundaries or unjustified prejudices. We are open to discuss with members of all the orders who share the common grounds of Freemasonry, whether they desire to be members of our order or not.

    Also, because we are an international order, we work closely with our Sisters and Brethren in other countries.

    We aim at practising an authentic Freemasonry, without casting doubts on how "real" other practices are. They are just not our practices. They are only one of the paths to the truth, the one we have chosen.

     

    [notice]Edit February 2014:
    A handful of former members of our Pioneer Lodge decided, after their expulsion, to create their own order independent of Le Droit Humain, using the name of our Pioneer Lodge Elizabeth St Leger, and backdating their decision to January 2014.

    They have no connection to Pioneer Lodge Elizabeth St Leger or Le Droit Humain.

    [/notice]

  • Is Le Droit Humain recognized by other masonic orders?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    Le Droit Humain is in fraternal relations with a number of masonic orders (meaning recognition is reciprocal and members can intervisit).

    Le Droit Humain recognises a number of masonic orders (but is not reciprocally recognized by them as a regular masonic order.)

    If you belong to a masonic order:

    • Ask your order if you want to know if you are allowed by them to go and visit us
    • Ask us if you want to know if you are allowed to come and visit us

    We might welcome visitors whose order does not recognize us, but we do not encourage Freemasons to defy the orders they are members of.

  • What is the highest "level" or "degrees" of Freemasonry? Is it 3? or 33? or 34?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    This point is often misunderstood included by Freemasons themselves.

    The highest degree in Freemasonry is the 3rd: Master Mason

    There is no "higher" level than the 3rd. It is the degree needed to take part in masonic work, for instance chairing a lodge meeting.

    A Master Mason is as high as you can get as a Freemason, after having been initiated as an Entered Apprentice, and then trained as a Fellow Craft.

    There is no need or obligation for any Freemason to go any further if they do not so wish. It does not make them lesser Freemasons.

    Further degrees

    Some orders, like ours, offer a path that consists of further degrees.

    They are not "higher" than the third degree, but they can be seen as "further" or "deeper".

    We "work" the "Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite" from the 1st to the 33rd degree.

    Other orders may have another degree structure.

  • Is Freemasonry a secret organization?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    No. It is an organization with secrets.

    It is not a "secret society" with nefarious aims or criminal activities, covered by a coded language.

    But it is an organization that needed, at a time in its history, to be discrete. This required some signs to recognize people that could be trusted, at a time when sharing ideas and crossing "party lines" (in term of politics or religion) freely was condemnable.

    These signs, rituals and other codes remain, but they are not the true "secrets" of Freemasonry. They are widely available on the Internet, and are only external representations of the facts that some of our teachings are not communicable in any other ways but in experiencing them.

    Freemasonry is a pathway of initiation, free from dogma, inspired by the search for truth and an understanding of human consciousness – a science of the spirit. Masonic ritual and symbolism are the tools Freemasons use on that journey, whether this is their personal spiritual path towards the perfection of mankind; to liberty, equality and fraternity – human rights, Le Droit Humain.

    The authentic secrets of an authentic Freemasonry cannot be communicated by words or signs: they are experienced in walking the initiatic path to truth.

  • What is Le Droit Human?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    The International Order of Freemasonry for men and women, Le Droit Humain, is worldwide. Membership is open to all adults, without distinction of gender, biological heritage or personal beliefs.

    Our Order is founded on the ancient teachings and traditions of Freemasonry.
    An Irish lodge has been in the process of being founded since 2012, as a pioneer triangle “Elizabeth Saint Leger” (Motto: As Above, So Below) in the honour of the first female Irish freemason.
    The Order was founded in 1893.

    The International Order of Freemasonry for men and women, Le Droit Humain, works to the glory of the Great Architect of the Universe and/or to the perfection of humanity. On an individual level, it strives ” to promote the progress of individual worth, without the imposition of dogma, or exacting the abandonment of cultural or religious ideas”. On a group level “it works to unite men and women who agree on a humanist spirituality whilst respecting individual and cultural differences”.

    Freemasonry is a pathway of initiation, free from dogma, inspired by the search for truth, an understanding of human consciousness – a science of the spirit. Masonic ritual and symbolism are the tools Freemasons use on that journey, whether this is their personal spiritual path towards the perfection of mankind; to liberty, equality and fraternity – human rights, Le Droit Humain.

    Le Droit Humain in the world: http://www.droit-humain.org/en/index.php?seccion=64

  • 3.FAQ - Franc-maçonnerie
  • What is Freemasonry, in a nutshell?

    patrick09-03-2014

    Freemasonry is an initiatory system containing the keys to the ancient mysteries, which are experienced through a series of mystery dramas designed to open up and deepen awareness and understanding.

    You can find more on the details here: http://www.droit-humain.org/en/index.php?seccion=5

  • Are freemasons above the law?

    Albert Cowan29-06-2013

    Freemasons are under the same civil laws as ll citizens, and they apply stringent criteria to themselves than the law demands.

    Thus, one found guilty of a crime does no longer meet the requirements of good character, whether or not an official internal inquiry has been held.
    By breaking the civil law, in ways that condemn them to more than a fine, a Freemason is no longer Free, and thus no longer a Mason.

    In any case, trying to protect an offender, shelter them from prosecution, hide their guilt, swipe a registered judgement under the carpet, or to demand such unmasonic behaviors to be carried out by others, is in itself unmasonic.

  • Is Freemasonry a cult?

    Albert Cowan24-06-2013

    No, but any cult would say that.

    First, let's clarify how the world "cult" and "sect" can have multiple usages: mainstream religious cult and philosophical sects made of follower of the likes of Plato, are not what this question is addressed at.
    The question refers to some form of organization that submits members' wills and bodies, separate them from their families and friends, oppress them and extracts large amounts of money, and/or have obscure and dangerous aims. The judging criteria are not the ideological beliefs but the actions and behaviors that violate the rights, dignity and freedom of the human person.

    And often members of a religious or political organization will call "a cult" any organization that they disagree with.

    So in order to answer the question objectively, we have to address some objective criteria laid out by a recognized body. We can take the criteria of the French association of defense of individuals and families: http://www.unadfi.org/caracteristiques-des-sectes-selon (translated and summarized here):

    To describe a group of "cult", we retain the criterion of harmfulness or extremely dangerous group by the combination of three characteristics:

    • Mental manipulation
      • Indoctrination
      • Mind Control
      • Feeding dependency
      • Pressures
    • Triple destruction
      • Destruction of the person
        (physically, weaken the body; psychological, weaken critical mind; intellectual, reduce the field and sources of knowledge; relational, reduce social skills and contacts; social, withdraw from society)
      • Destruction of the family
        (breakup relationships, undermine authority, estrange from children, recruit children)
      • Destruction of society
        (infiltrate institutions, or desert them, reject legal authority, turn anyone external to an enemy, prevent involvement as a citizen, remove from cultural and social activities)
    • Triple scam
      • Intellectual
        (You never get what was promised, it is always postponed and everyone else is blamed for the failure to deliver. Members first of all)
      • Moral
        (Members usually become victim of all sorts of abuses, and have lost the will to even see that they are victims)
      • Financial
        (The bigger red flag of them all is the money aspect. If you spend more than 1% of your disposable income you have to start to worry; more than 10% there is no doubt about the cultish nature of the organization)

    The FAQ's address the main criteria: unreasonable financial demands, negative impact on trust and relationship with family and friends, social and intellectual submission.

    In a nut shell, it is a very strong principle of Freemasonry that members have to strike a balance in their lives between their professional life, their private life, their social obligations and their rest.

    Freemasonry should not cost members more time or money than any social club they may belong to, like an acting society for instance.
    And if they decide to take on more responsibilities, for instance becoming a treasurer, they are requires to inspect their own conscience to decide if that extra time commitment is compatible with their other obligations; and they are encouraged to discuss with their family how this will impact their free time.

    In Freemasonry, the ultimate priority is the Freemason's happiness and balance. And their family should always be included in making big decisions when joining or when progressing.

  • Are freemasons worshipping the devil?

    Albert Cowan27-05-2013

    No.

    Freemasonry is not a worship.

    We do not worship any entity. And any worship, under any name, which is offensive to our humanistic values is not compatible with Freemasonry.

  • Is Le Droit Humain the only "real" Freemasonry order in Ireland?

    Albert Cowan27-05-2013

    No.

    There are more than one order of Freemasonry in Ireland, and Le Droit Humain is the latest addition.

    Some others orders may or may not recognize us as "real" or "valid" or "fraternal", they may see our order as being out of order and "irregular". They would not allow their members to visit us, or allow our members to visit them. That is likely to be the case, for instance, of orders that do not accept women in their midst

    Some may recognize us in spite of our divergences on some points.

    We think that openness and fraternal relationships are more important than organizational structures, national boundaries or unjustified prejudices. We are open to discuss with members of all the orders who share the common grounds of Freemasonry, whether they desire to be members of our order or not.

    Also, because we are an international order, we work closely with our Sisters and Brethren in other countries.

    We aim at practising an authentic Freemasonry, without casting doubts on how "real" other practices are. They are just not our practices. They are only one of the paths to the truth, the one we have chosen.

     

    [notice]Edit February 2014:
    A handful of former members of our Pioneer Lodge decided, after their expulsion, to create their own order independent of Le Droit Humain, using the name of our Pioneer Lodge Elizabeth St Leger, and backdating their decision to January 2014.

    They have no connection to Pioneer Lodge Elizabeth St Leger or Le Droit Humain.

    [/notice]

  • How much does it cost to join Freemasonry?

    Albert Cowan24-05-2013

    The cost of joining the Order is associated with the cost of running it.
    The total cost will depend on each lodge, but it should never exceed what you would be ready to pay for joining a club (a choir, a theater group, a sports club or a gym).

    There is a once-off joining fee when joining a lodge.
    There is then an annual fee, to be paid every year.
    There is a fee associated with each ceremony linked to masonic degrees.
    None of these fees would exceed a 2 figure number.

    Then you can expect costs related to charitable activities, but again they should never stretch to anything that would be unreasonable for any other voluntary activities or hobbies.

    Members are invited to not contribute above their means, and as a guideline, to not volunteer further sums that would exceed what they would give a charity or their church if they contribute to such bodies.
    The value of members is not indexed to their financial contribution.

    A good guideline is that if your expenses on any voluntary activity is over 1% of your disposable income, you should start to look closer and start thinking about cutting back.

    The most precious contribution will more likely be the time you invest, as long as that time does not interfere with other social obligations, especially family and work obligations.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... an atheist?

    Albert Cowan21-05-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.

    The reference to the "Great Architect of the Universe" (formerly the "Supreme Being" found in the French Constitution) does not necessitate the belief in a personal deity or in any deity. It does not contradict such as belief either, but it does not imply it.

    The "Great Architect of the Universe" can of course be understood to be the god(s) of any religion our members may adhere to. But it can also be "science" or "human consciousnesses", etc..

    For Freemasons, the concept of "Great Architect of the Universe" is an organizing principle rather than a dogmatic belief. Freemasonry does not offer dogmas.

  • Will a judge show leniency to me if we are both freemasons?

    Albert Cowan27-04-2013

    A judge should be impartial, and Freemasons should be law abiding.

    So your membership as a Freemason would not tilt the balance of Justice one way or the other. But if it did (it won't), it should be in the sense of more severity.

    If you are committing a crime in civil law, you have most certainly already breach your duty as a Freemason: you should not expect any help with civil proceeding, and rather expect further disciplinary action from your sisters and brethren.

    Freemasonry is not a free pass for anything.
    If anything it is more demanding of its members because of their commitment to the truth and to self-improvement for the benefit of humanity.

  • Does Freemasonry support a political party?

    Albert Cowan28-03-2013

    No.

    Freemasonry is not political.

    It expects its members to form and keep their own political convictions, and it does not permit discussion on political matters at Masonic meetings and gatherings.

    Traditionally, some orders may be, in some countries, identified with some political wings or parties.
    But the reality is that members of all parties may belong to any of the orders so "identified".

    It is only natural that more conservative orders may attract more people for more conservative parties, that more liberal orders may attract more people for more liberal parties, that more progressive orders may attract more people for more progressive parties. But it is just coincidental.

    As long as someone shares the humanistic values of Freemasonry, there is no reason to exclude them (or include them) on political grounds.

    Historically, some authoritarian regimes may have banned Freemasonry, but that can only be seen as a good sign.

  • Is Freemasonry a religion?

    Albert Cowan28-03-2013

    No.

    Freemasonry is not a religion, or a combination of religions, nor is it a substitute for religion. It expects its members to adhere to their own faith, and it does not permit discussion on religious matters at Masonic meetings and gatherings, other than to augment their understanding of humanity in a fraternal atmosphere of sharing and understanding.

  • What are the advantages or privileges of being a freemason?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    None other than fraternally working towards improving yourself, be of service to your fellow women and men, and search for the truth.

    There are no financial incentive in being a member. It will not give you a job, a business advantage, or help you escape the law.

  • Is Le Droit Humain recognized by other masonic orders?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    Le Droit Humain is in fraternal relations with a number of masonic orders (meaning recognition is reciprocal and members can intervisit).

    Le Droit Humain recognises a number of masonic orders (but is not reciprocally recognized by them as a regular masonic order.)

    If you belong to a masonic order:

    • Ask your order if you want to know if you are allowed by them to go and visit us
    • Ask us if you want to know if you are allowed to come and visit us

    We might welcome visitors whose order does not recognize us, but we do not encourage Freemasons to defy the orders they are members of.

  • What is the highest "level" or "degrees" of Freemasonry? Is it 3? or 33? or 34?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    This point is often misunderstood included by Freemasons themselves.

    The highest degree in Freemasonry is the 3rd: Master Mason

    There is no "higher" level than the 3rd. It is the degree needed to take part in masonic work, for instance chairing a lodge meeting.

    A Master Mason is as high as you can get as a Freemason, after having been initiated as an Entered Apprentice, and then trained as a Fellow Craft.

    There is no need or obligation for any Freemason to go any further if they do not so wish. It does not make them lesser Freemasons.

    Further degrees

    Some orders, like ours, offer a path that consists of further degrees.

    They are not "higher" than the third degree, but they can be seen as "further" or "deeper".

    We "work" the "Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite" from the 1st to the 33rd degree.

    Other orders may have another degree structure.

  • Is Freemasonry a secret organization?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    No. It is an organization with secrets.

    It is not a "secret society" with nefarious aims or criminal activities, covered by a coded language.

    But it is an organization that needed, at a time in its history, to be discrete. This required some signs to recognize people that could be trusted, at a time when sharing ideas and crossing "party lines" (in term of politics or religion) freely was condemnable.

    These signs, rituals and other codes remain, but they are not the true "secrets" of Freemasonry. They are widely available on the Internet, and are only external representations of the facts that some of our teachings are not communicable in any other ways but in experiencing them.

    Freemasonry is a pathway of initiation, free from dogma, inspired by the search for truth and an understanding of human consciousness – a science of the spirit. Masonic ritual and symbolism are the tools Freemasons use on that journey, whether this is their personal spiritual path towards the perfection of mankind; to liberty, equality and fraternity – human rights, Le Droit Humain.

    The authentic secrets of an authentic Freemasonry cannot be communicated by words or signs: they are experienced in walking the initiatic path to truth.

  • Is membership a secret?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    No. And Yes...

    No, not for you

    No, it is not one of the "secret" of Freemasonry. You can reveal your membership to whom you want, when you want.

    It is even strongly encouraged that you let your family know. It is encouraged that you let your friends know. Because family and friends are the best counsel anyone can find.
    They can keep you in check and make sure that you do not let any activity in your life "take over"; that includes Freemasonry.
    They can also advise you when you are wondering if you should invest more time with Freemasonry, by taking more responsibilities, or if you are doing enough already as regards to your other social obligations.

    As for work, or religious groups you belong too, or other social clubs, it is up to you to decide whom to tell and when to tell them. And if someone is approaching you to ask about it, they may be interested, so feel free to share. But you are certainly not encouraged to "talk people into joining".

    Yes, for others

    Just like anything which relates to the intimate (e.g., religion, sexuality, spirituality, relationships, fantasies, dreams and hopes), there is a difference between "coming out" by yourself to people, and "being outed" by others.

    It is unacceptable to disclose someone's membership without their express and renewed consent.
    It is similar to the coming out/outing of gay people: it should not be a big deal to be "out", but it is never acceptable to "out" someone else.

  • What is Le Droit Human?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    The International Order of Freemasonry for men and women, Le Droit Humain, is worldwide. Membership is open to all adults, without distinction of gender, biological heritage or personal beliefs.

    Our Order is founded on the ancient teachings and traditions of Freemasonry.
    An Irish lodge has been in the process of being founded since 2012, as a pioneer triangle “Elizabeth Saint Leger” (Motto: As Above, So Below) in the honour of the first female Irish freemason.
    The Order was founded in 1893.

    The International Order of Freemasonry for men and women, Le Droit Humain, works to the glory of the Great Architect of the Universe and/or to the perfection of humanity. On an individual level, it strives ” to promote the progress of individual worth, without the imposition of dogma, or exacting the abandonment of cultural or religious ideas”. On a group level “it works to unite men and women who agree on a humanist spirituality whilst respecting individual and cultural differences”.

    Freemasonry is a pathway of initiation, free from dogma, inspired by the search for truth, an understanding of human consciousness – a science of the spirit. Masonic ritual and symbolism are the tools Freemasons use on that journey, whether this is their personal spiritual path towards the perfection of mankind; to liberty, equality and fraternity – human rights, Le Droit Humain.

    Le Droit Humain in the world: http://www.droit-humain.org/en/index.php?seccion=64

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... a woman?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    We know that good people can be of any gender: male, female, cis- or trans-.

    After all, before any central Freemason organization formed in Ireland, a woman was famously initiated in Cork: the Lady Freemason, Elizabeth Aldworth, born Elizabeth Saint Leger.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... "Colored"?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds. Especially not based on racist fantasies.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    First, the term "Colored" (or "Black", or "Negro", or "Asian", or "Caucasian", or other racial/ethnic/etc. terminologies) in itself is inherited from a tradition of discrimination based on invalid scientific concepts. For instance no one is "black". Some people's skin can be various shades of brown, pink, or other... but never "black". Why then use a word referring to something else than the actual color?
    This was very smartly addressed in the film Pleasantville.

    We welcome members of all cultural and biological backgrounds, without caring for the hue of the color of their skin, and without reference to cultural bias they may suffer due to the circumstances of their births.

    We are not color-blind: we see people's true colors, and that does not include the color of their skin.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... a politician?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    On the one hand, we do encourage our members to remain active on all the dimensions of their lives that enrich them, without trying to influence them in how they invest themselves. That includes their involvement in the life of the city.
    On the other hand, we promote mutual respect between brethren and with the rest of the world. So if your way to be political is promoting intolerance and discrimination, then you would probably not find membership to our order rewarding.

    In all cases, we do not promote any dogma over another, and topics and issues related to this area remain "at the doors" of our Order.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... religious?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    Freemasonry is not a religion, or a combination of religions, nor is it a substitute for religion. It expects its members to adhere to their own faith, and it does not permit discussion on religious matters at Masonic meetings and gatherings.

    On the one hand, we do encourage our members to remain active on all the dimensions of their lives that enrich them, without trying to influence them in how they invest themselves. That includes their faith/worship of choice.
    On the other hand, we promote mutual respect between sisters/brethren and with the rest of the world. So if your way to be religious is promoting intolerance and discrimination, then you would probably not find membership to our order rewarding.

    In all cases, we do not promote any dogma over another, and topics and issues related to this area remain "at the doors" of our Order.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... not well-off?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    The cost of being a Freemason is similar to the cost of belonging to any club or organization.
    It would not cost more, or less, than belonging to an acting club or to a sports club, or to a gym.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... gay?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    Without entering in the debate of knowing if sexual orientation is the result of a nature or of a choice, or a combination of both, we can serenely claim that it does not matter.
    We only care about what someone does to become a better person, and sexuality in itself does not predetermine the ability to be a good person.

  • Who can join freemasonry?

    Albert Cowan24-03-2013

    Anyone who is an adult of good character, and fosters a desire to be useful to their fellow men and women.

  • This site is under construction

    patrick24-03-2013

    The International Order of Freemasonry for men and women, Le Droit Humain, is worldwide.

    Membership is open to all adults, without distinction of gender, biological or cultural heritage, or personal beliefs.

    For information: contact@freemasonsireland.org

    Le Droit Humain in the world: http://www.droit-humain.org/en/index.php?seccion=64

    [Spider_FAQ id="1"]

  • 4.FAQ - Freemasonry
  • What is Freemasonry, in a nutshell?

    patrick09-03-2014

    Freemasonry is an initiatory system containing the keys to the ancient mysteries, which are experienced through a series of mystery dramas designed to open up and deepen awareness and understanding.

    You can find more on the details here: http://www.droit-humain.org/en/index.php?seccion=5

  • Are freemasons above the law?

    Albert Cowan29-06-2013

    Freemasons are under the same civil laws as ll citizens, and they apply stringent criteria to themselves than the law demands.

    Thus, one found guilty of a crime does no longer meet the requirements of good character, whether or not an official internal inquiry has been held.
    By breaking the civil law, in ways that condemn them to more than a fine, a Freemason is no longer Free, and thus no longer a Mason.

    In any case, trying to protect an offender, shelter them from prosecution, hide their guilt, swipe a registered judgement under the carpet, or to demand such unmasonic behaviors to be carried out by others, is in itself unmasonic.

  • Is Freemasonry a cult?

    Albert Cowan24-06-2013

    No, but any cult would say that.

    First, let's clarify how the world "cult" and "sect" can have multiple usages: mainstream religious cult and philosophical sects made of follower of the likes of Plato, are not what this question is addressed at.
    The question refers to some form of organization that submits members' wills and bodies, separate them from their families and friends, oppress them and extracts large amounts of money, and/or have obscure and dangerous aims. The judging criteria are not the ideological beliefs but the actions and behaviors that violate the rights, dignity and freedom of the human person.

    And often members of a religious or political organization will call "a cult" any organization that they disagree with.

    So in order to answer the question objectively, we have to address some objective criteria laid out by a recognized body. We can take the criteria of the French association of defense of individuals and families: http://www.unadfi.org/caracteristiques-des-sectes-selon (translated and summarized here):

    To describe a group of "cult", we retain the criterion of harmfulness or extremely dangerous group by the combination of three characteristics:

    • Mental manipulation
      • Indoctrination
      • Mind Control
      • Feeding dependency
      • Pressures
    • Triple destruction
      • Destruction of the person
        (physically, weaken the body; psychological, weaken critical mind; intellectual, reduce the field and sources of knowledge; relational, reduce social skills and contacts; social, withdraw from society)
      • Destruction of the family
        (breakup relationships, undermine authority, estrange from children, recruit children)
      • Destruction of society
        (infiltrate institutions, or desert them, reject legal authority, turn anyone external to an enemy, prevent involvement as a citizen, remove from cultural and social activities)
    • Triple scam
      • Intellectual
        (You never get what was promised, it is always postponed and everyone else is blamed for the failure to deliver. Members first of all)
      • Moral
        (Members usually become victim of all sorts of abuses, and have lost the will to even see that they are victims)
      • Financial
        (The bigger red flag of them all is the money aspect. If you spend more than 1% of your disposable income you have to start to worry; more than 10% there is no doubt about the cultish nature of the organization)

    The FAQ's address the main criteria: unreasonable financial demands, negative impact on trust and relationship with family and friends, social and intellectual submission.

    In a nut shell, it is a very strong principle of Freemasonry that members have to strike a balance in their lives between their professional life, their private life, their social obligations and their rest.

    Freemasonry should not cost members more time or money than any social club they may belong to, like an acting society for instance.
    And if they decide to take on more responsibilities, for instance becoming a treasurer, they are requires to inspect their own conscience to decide if that extra time commitment is compatible with their other obligations; and they are encouraged to discuss with their family how this will impact their free time.

    In Freemasonry, the ultimate priority is the Freemason's happiness and balance. And their family should always be included in making big decisions when joining or when progressing.

  • Are freemasons worshipping the devil?

    Albert Cowan27-05-2013

    No.

    Freemasonry is not a worship.

    We do not worship any entity. And any worship, under any name, which is offensive to our humanistic values is not compatible with Freemasonry.

  • Will a judge show leniency to me if we are both freemasons?

    Albert Cowan27-04-2013

    A judge should be impartial, and Freemasons should be law abiding.

    So your membership as a Freemason would not tilt the balance of Justice one way or the other. But if it did (it won't), it should be in the sense of more severity.

    If you are committing a crime in civil law, you have most certainly already breach your duty as a Freemason: you should not expect any help with civil proceeding, and rather expect further disciplinary action from your sisters and brethren.

    Freemasonry is not a free pass for anything.
    If anything it is more demanding of its members because of their commitment to the truth and to self-improvement for the benefit of humanity.

  • Does Freemasonry support a political party?

    Albert Cowan28-03-2013

    No.

    Freemasonry is not political.

    It expects its members to form and keep their own political convictions, and it does not permit discussion on political matters at Masonic meetings and gatherings.

    Traditionally, some orders may be, in some countries, identified with some political wings or parties.
    But the reality is that members of all parties may belong to any of the orders so "identified".

    It is only natural that more conservative orders may attract more people for more conservative parties, that more liberal orders may attract more people for more liberal parties, that more progressive orders may attract more people for more progressive parties. But it is just coincidental.

    As long as someone shares the humanistic values of Freemasonry, there is no reason to exclude them (or include them) on political grounds.

    Historically, some authoritarian regimes may have banned Freemasonry, but that can only be seen as a good sign.

  • Is Freemasonry a religion?

    Albert Cowan28-03-2013

    No.

    Freemasonry is not a religion, or a combination of religions, nor is it a substitute for religion. It expects its members to adhere to their own faith, and it does not permit discussion on religious matters at Masonic meetings and gatherings, other than to augment their understanding of humanity in a fraternal atmosphere of sharing and understanding.

  • What are the advantages or privileges of being a freemason?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    None other than fraternally working towards improving yourself, be of service to your fellow women and men, and search for the truth.

    There are no financial incentive in being a member. It will not give you a job, a business advantage, or help you escape the law.

  • Is Freemasonry a secret organization?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    No. It is an organization with secrets.

    It is not a "secret society" with nefarious aims or criminal activities, covered by a coded language.

    But it is an organization that needed, at a time in its history, to be discrete. This required some signs to recognize people that could be trusted, at a time when sharing ideas and crossing "party lines" (in term of politics or religion) freely was condemnable.

    These signs, rituals and other codes remain, but they are not the true "secrets" of Freemasonry. They are widely available on the Internet, and are only external representations of the facts that some of our teachings are not communicable in any other ways but in experiencing them.

    Freemasonry is a pathway of initiation, free from dogma, inspired by the search for truth and an understanding of human consciousness – a science of the spirit. Masonic ritual and symbolism are the tools Freemasons use on that journey, whether this is their personal spiritual path towards the perfection of mankind; to liberty, equality and fraternity – human rights, Le Droit Humain.

    The authentic secrets of an authentic Freemasonry cannot be communicated by words or signs: they are experienced in walking the initiatic path to truth.

  • 5.FAQ - Adhésion
  • What is Freemasonry, in a nutshell?

    patrick09-03-2014

    Freemasonry is an initiatory system containing the keys to the ancient mysteries, which are experienced through a series of mystery dramas designed to open up and deepen awareness and understanding.

    You can find more on the details here: http://www.droit-humain.org/en/index.php?seccion=5

  • Are freemasons above the law?

    Albert Cowan29-06-2013

    Freemasons are under the same civil laws as ll citizens, and they apply stringent criteria to themselves than the law demands.

    Thus, one found guilty of a crime does no longer meet the requirements of good character, whether or not an official internal inquiry has been held.
    By breaking the civil law, in ways that condemn them to more than a fine, a Freemason is no longer Free, and thus no longer a Mason.

    In any case, trying to protect an offender, shelter them from prosecution, hide their guilt, swipe a registered judgement under the carpet, or to demand such unmasonic behaviors to be carried out by others, is in itself unmasonic.

  • Is Freemasonry a cult?

    Albert Cowan24-06-2013

    No, but any cult would say that.

    First, let's clarify how the world "cult" and "sect" can have multiple usages: mainstream religious cult and philosophical sects made of follower of the likes of Plato, are not what this question is addressed at.
    The question refers to some form of organization that submits members' wills and bodies, separate them from their families and friends, oppress them and extracts large amounts of money, and/or have obscure and dangerous aims. The judging criteria are not the ideological beliefs but the actions and behaviors that violate the rights, dignity and freedom of the human person.

    And often members of a religious or political organization will call "a cult" any organization that they disagree with.

    So in order to answer the question objectively, we have to address some objective criteria laid out by a recognized body. We can take the criteria of the French association of defense of individuals and families: http://www.unadfi.org/caracteristiques-des-sectes-selon (translated and summarized here):

    To describe a group of "cult", we retain the criterion of harmfulness or extremely dangerous group by the combination of three characteristics:

    • Mental manipulation
      • Indoctrination
      • Mind Control
      • Feeding dependency
      • Pressures
    • Triple destruction
      • Destruction of the person
        (physically, weaken the body; psychological, weaken critical mind; intellectual, reduce the field and sources of knowledge; relational, reduce social skills and contacts; social, withdraw from society)
      • Destruction of the family
        (breakup relationships, undermine authority, estrange from children, recruit children)
      • Destruction of society
        (infiltrate institutions, or desert them, reject legal authority, turn anyone external to an enemy, prevent involvement as a citizen, remove from cultural and social activities)
    • Triple scam
      • Intellectual
        (You never get what was promised, it is always postponed and everyone else is blamed for the failure to deliver. Members first of all)
      • Moral
        (Members usually become victim of all sorts of abuses, and have lost the will to even see that they are victims)
      • Financial
        (The bigger red flag of them all is the money aspect. If you spend more than 1% of your disposable income you have to start to worry; more than 10% there is no doubt about the cultish nature of the organization)

    The FAQ's address the main criteria: unreasonable financial demands, negative impact on trust and relationship with family and friends, social and intellectual submission.

    In a nut shell, it is a very strong principle of Freemasonry that members have to strike a balance in their lives between their professional life, their private life, their social obligations and their rest.

    Freemasonry should not cost members more time or money than any social club they may belong to, like an acting society for instance.
    And if they decide to take on more responsibilities, for instance becoming a treasurer, they are requires to inspect their own conscience to decide if that extra time commitment is compatible with their other obligations; and they are encouraged to discuss with their family how this will impact their free time.

    In Freemasonry, the ultimate priority is the Freemason's happiness and balance. And their family should always be included in making big decisions when joining or when progressing.

  • Are freemasons worshipping the devil?

    Albert Cowan27-05-2013

    No.

    Freemasonry is not a worship.

    We do not worship any entity. And any worship, under any name, which is offensive to our humanistic values is not compatible with Freemasonry.

  • Is Le Droit Humain the only "real" Freemasonry order in Ireland?

    Albert Cowan27-05-2013

    No.

    There are more than one order of Freemasonry in Ireland, and Le Droit Humain is the latest addition.

    Some others orders may or may not recognize us as "real" or "valid" or "fraternal", they may see our order as being out of order and "irregular". They would not allow their members to visit us, or allow our members to visit them. That is likely to be the case, for instance, of orders that do not accept women in their midst

    Some may recognize us in spite of our divergences on some points.

    We think that openness and fraternal relationships are more important than organizational structures, national boundaries or unjustified prejudices. We are open to discuss with members of all the orders who share the common grounds of Freemasonry, whether they desire to be members of our order or not.

    Also, because we are an international order, we work closely with our Sisters and Brethren in other countries.

    We aim at practising an authentic Freemasonry, without casting doubts on how "real" other practices are. They are just not our practices. They are only one of the paths to the truth, the one we have chosen.

     

    [notice]Edit February 2014:
    A handful of former members of our Pioneer Lodge decided, after their expulsion, to create their own order independent of Le Droit Humain, using the name of our Pioneer Lodge Elizabeth St Leger, and backdating their decision to January 2014.

    They have no connection to Pioneer Lodge Elizabeth St Leger or Le Droit Humain.

    [/notice]

  • How much does it cost to join Freemasonry?

    Albert Cowan24-05-2013

    The cost of joining the Order is associated with the cost of running it.
    The total cost will depend on each lodge, but it should never exceed what you would be ready to pay for joining a club (a choir, a theater group, a sports club or a gym).

    There is a once-off joining fee when joining a lodge.
    There is then an annual fee, to be paid every year.
    There is a fee associated with each ceremony linked to masonic degrees.
    None of these fees would exceed a 2 figure number.

    Then you can expect costs related to charitable activities, but again they should never stretch to anything that would be unreasonable for any other voluntary activities or hobbies.

    Members are invited to not contribute above their means, and as a guideline, to not volunteer further sums that would exceed what they would give a charity or their church if they contribute to such bodies.
    The value of members is not indexed to their financial contribution.

    A good guideline is that if your expenses on any voluntary activity is over 1% of your disposable income, you should start to look closer and start thinking about cutting back.

    The most precious contribution will more likely be the time you invest, as long as that time does not interfere with other social obligations, especially family and work obligations.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... an atheist?

    Albert Cowan21-05-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.

    The reference to the "Great Architect of the Universe" (formerly the "Supreme Being" found in the French Constitution) does not necessitate the belief in a personal deity or in any deity. It does not contradict such as belief either, but it does not imply it.

    The "Great Architect of the Universe" can of course be understood to be the god(s) of any religion our members may adhere to. But it can also be "science" or "human consciousnesses", etc..

    For Freemasons, the concept of "Great Architect of the Universe" is an organizing principle rather than a dogmatic belief. Freemasonry does not offer dogmas.

  • Will a judge show leniency to me if we are both freemasons?

    Albert Cowan27-04-2013

    A judge should be impartial, and Freemasons should be law abiding.

    So your membership as a Freemason would not tilt the balance of Justice one way or the other. But if it did (it won't), it should be in the sense of more severity.

    If you are committing a crime in civil law, you have most certainly already breach your duty as a Freemason: you should not expect any help with civil proceeding, and rather expect further disciplinary action from your sisters and brethren.

    Freemasonry is not a free pass for anything.
    If anything it is more demanding of its members because of their commitment to the truth and to self-improvement for the benefit of humanity.

  • Does Freemasonry support a political party?

    Albert Cowan28-03-2013

    No.

    Freemasonry is not political.

    It expects its members to form and keep their own political convictions, and it does not permit discussion on political matters at Masonic meetings and gatherings.

    Traditionally, some orders may be, in some countries, identified with some political wings or parties.
    But the reality is that members of all parties may belong to any of the orders so "identified".

    It is only natural that more conservative orders may attract more people for more conservative parties, that more liberal orders may attract more people for more liberal parties, that more progressive orders may attract more people for more progressive parties. But it is just coincidental.

    As long as someone shares the humanistic values of Freemasonry, there is no reason to exclude them (or include them) on political grounds.

    Historically, some authoritarian regimes may have banned Freemasonry, but that can only be seen as a good sign.

  • Is Freemasonry a religion?

    Albert Cowan28-03-2013

    No.

    Freemasonry is not a religion, or a combination of religions, nor is it a substitute for religion. It expects its members to adhere to their own faith, and it does not permit discussion on religious matters at Masonic meetings and gatherings, other than to augment their understanding of humanity in a fraternal atmosphere of sharing and understanding.

  • What are the advantages or privileges of being a freemason?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    None other than fraternally working towards improving yourself, be of service to your fellow women and men, and search for the truth.

    There are no financial incentive in being a member. It will not give you a job, a business advantage, or help you escape the law.

  • Is Le Droit Humain recognized by other masonic orders?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    Le Droit Humain is in fraternal relations with a number of masonic orders (meaning recognition is reciprocal and members can intervisit).

    Le Droit Humain recognises a number of masonic orders (but is not reciprocally recognized by them as a regular masonic order.)

    If you belong to a masonic order:

    • Ask your order if you want to know if you are allowed by them to go and visit us
    • Ask us if you want to know if you are allowed to come and visit us

    We might welcome visitors whose order does not recognize us, but we do not encourage Freemasons to defy the orders they are members of.

  • What is the highest "level" or "degrees" of Freemasonry? Is it 3? or 33? or 34?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    This point is often misunderstood included by Freemasons themselves.

    The highest degree in Freemasonry is the 3rd: Master Mason

    There is no "higher" level than the 3rd. It is the degree needed to take part in masonic work, for instance chairing a lodge meeting.

    A Master Mason is as high as you can get as a Freemason, after having been initiated as an Entered Apprentice, and then trained as a Fellow Craft.

    There is no need or obligation for any Freemason to go any further if they do not so wish. It does not make them lesser Freemasons.

    Further degrees

    Some orders, like ours, offer a path that consists of further degrees.

    They are not "higher" than the third degree, but they can be seen as "further" or "deeper".

    We "work" the "Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite" from the 1st to the 33rd degree.

    Other orders may have another degree structure.

  • Is Freemasonry a secret organization?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    No. It is an organization with secrets.

    It is not a "secret society" with nefarious aims or criminal activities, covered by a coded language.

    But it is an organization that needed, at a time in its history, to be discrete. This required some signs to recognize people that could be trusted, at a time when sharing ideas and crossing "party lines" (in term of politics or religion) freely was condemnable.

    These signs, rituals and other codes remain, but they are not the true "secrets" of Freemasonry. They are widely available on the Internet, and are only external representations of the facts that some of our teachings are not communicable in any other ways but in experiencing them.

    Freemasonry is a pathway of initiation, free from dogma, inspired by the search for truth and an understanding of human consciousness – a science of the spirit. Masonic ritual and symbolism are the tools Freemasons use on that journey, whether this is their personal spiritual path towards the perfection of mankind; to liberty, equality and fraternity – human rights, Le Droit Humain.

    The authentic secrets of an authentic Freemasonry cannot be communicated by words or signs: they are experienced in walking the initiatic path to truth.

  • Is membership a secret?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    No. And Yes...

    No, not for you

    No, it is not one of the "secret" of Freemasonry. You can reveal your membership to whom you want, when you want.

    It is even strongly encouraged that you let your family know. It is encouraged that you let your friends know. Because family and friends are the best counsel anyone can find.
    They can keep you in check and make sure that you do not let any activity in your life "take over"; that includes Freemasonry.
    They can also advise you when you are wondering if you should invest more time with Freemasonry, by taking more responsibilities, or if you are doing enough already as regards to your other social obligations.

    As for work, or religious groups you belong too, or other social clubs, it is up to you to decide whom to tell and when to tell them. And if someone is approaching you to ask about it, they may be interested, so feel free to share. But you are certainly not encouraged to "talk people into joining".

    Yes, for others

    Just like anything which relates to the intimate (e.g., religion, sexuality, spirituality, relationships, fantasies, dreams and hopes), there is a difference between "coming out" by yourself to people, and "being outed" by others.

    It is unacceptable to disclose someone's membership without their express and renewed consent.
    It is similar to the coming out/outing of gay people: it should not be a big deal to be "out", but it is never acceptable to "out" someone else.

  • What is Le Droit Human?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    The International Order of Freemasonry for men and women, Le Droit Humain, is worldwide. Membership is open to all adults, without distinction of gender, biological heritage or personal beliefs.

    Our Order is founded on the ancient teachings and traditions of Freemasonry.
    An Irish lodge has been in the process of being founded since 2012, as a pioneer triangle “Elizabeth Saint Leger” (Motto: As Above, So Below) in the honour of the first female Irish freemason.
    The Order was founded in 1893.

    The International Order of Freemasonry for men and women, Le Droit Humain, works to the glory of the Great Architect of the Universe and/or to the perfection of humanity. On an individual level, it strives ” to promote the progress of individual worth, without the imposition of dogma, or exacting the abandonment of cultural or religious ideas”. On a group level “it works to unite men and women who agree on a humanist spirituality whilst respecting individual and cultural differences”.

    Freemasonry is a pathway of initiation, free from dogma, inspired by the search for truth, an understanding of human consciousness – a science of the spirit. Masonic ritual and symbolism are the tools Freemasons use on that journey, whether this is their personal spiritual path towards the perfection of mankind; to liberty, equality and fraternity – human rights, Le Droit Humain.

    Le Droit Humain in the world: http://www.droit-humain.org/en/index.php?seccion=64

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... a woman?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    We know that good people can be of any gender: male, female, cis- or trans-.

    After all, before any central Freemason organization formed in Ireland, a woman was famously initiated in Cork: the Lady Freemason, Elizabeth Aldworth, born Elizabeth Saint Leger.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... "Colored"?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds. Especially not based on racist fantasies.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    First, the term "Colored" (or "Black", or "Negro", or "Asian", or "Caucasian", or other racial/ethnic/etc. terminologies) in itself is inherited from a tradition of discrimination based on invalid scientific concepts. For instance no one is "black". Some people's skin can be various shades of brown, pink, or other... but never "black". Why then use a word referring to something else than the actual color?
    This was very smartly addressed in the film Pleasantville.

    We welcome members of all cultural and biological backgrounds, without caring for the hue of the color of their skin, and without reference to cultural bias they may suffer due to the circumstances of their births.

    We are not color-blind: we see people's true colors, and that does not include the color of their skin.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... a politician?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    On the one hand, we do encourage our members to remain active on all the dimensions of their lives that enrich them, without trying to influence them in how they invest themselves. That includes their involvement in the life of the city.
    On the other hand, we promote mutual respect between brethren and with the rest of the world. So if your way to be political is promoting intolerance and discrimination, then you would probably not find membership to our order rewarding.

    In all cases, we do not promote any dogma over another, and topics and issues related to this area remain "at the doors" of our Order.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... religious?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    Freemasonry is not a religion, or a combination of religions, nor is it a substitute for religion. It expects its members to adhere to their own faith, and it does not permit discussion on religious matters at Masonic meetings and gatherings.

    On the one hand, we do encourage our members to remain active on all the dimensions of their lives that enrich them, without trying to influence them in how they invest themselves. That includes their faith/worship of choice.
    On the other hand, we promote mutual respect between sisters/brethren and with the rest of the world. So if your way to be religious is promoting intolerance and discrimination, then you would probably not find membership to our order rewarding.

    In all cases, we do not promote any dogma over another, and topics and issues related to this area remain "at the doors" of our Order.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... not well-off?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    The cost of being a Freemason is similar to the cost of belonging to any club or organization.
    It would not cost more, or less, than belonging to an acting club or to a sports club, or to a gym.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... gay?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    Without entering in the debate of knowing if sexual orientation is the result of a nature or of a choice, or a combination of both, we can serenely claim that it does not matter.
    We only care about what someone does to become a better person, and sexuality in itself does not predetermine the ability to be a good person.

  • Who can join freemasonry?

    Albert Cowan24-03-2013

    Anyone who is an adult of good character, and fosters a desire to be useful to their fellow men and women.

  • This site is under construction

    patrick24-03-2013

    The International Order of Freemasonry for men and women, Le Droit Humain, is worldwide.

    Membership is open to all adults, without distinction of gender, biological or cultural heritage, or personal beliefs.

    For information: contact@freemasonsireland.org

    Le Droit Humain in the world: http://www.droit-humain.org/en/index.php?seccion=64

    [Spider_FAQ id="1"]

  • 6.FAQ - Membership
  • Are freemasons above the law?

    Albert Cowan29-06-2013

    Freemasons are under the same civil laws as ll citizens, and they apply stringent criteria to themselves than the law demands.

    Thus, one found guilty of a crime does no longer meet the requirements of good character, whether or not an official internal inquiry has been held.
    By breaking the civil law, in ways that condemn them to more than a fine, a Freemason is no longer Free, and thus no longer a Mason.

    In any case, trying to protect an offender, shelter them from prosecution, hide their guilt, swipe a registered judgement under the carpet, or to demand such unmasonic behaviors to be carried out by others, is in itself unmasonic.

  • How much does it cost to join Freemasonry?

    Albert Cowan24-05-2013

    The cost of joining the Order is associated with the cost of running it.
    The total cost will depend on each lodge, but it should never exceed what you would be ready to pay for joining a club (a choir, a theater group, a sports club or a gym).

    There is a once-off joining fee when joining a lodge.
    There is then an annual fee, to be paid every year.
    There is a fee associated with each ceremony linked to masonic degrees.
    None of these fees would exceed a 2 figure number.

    Then you can expect costs related to charitable activities, but again they should never stretch to anything that would be unreasonable for any other voluntary activities or hobbies.

    Members are invited to not contribute above their means, and as a guideline, to not volunteer further sums that would exceed what they would give a charity or their church if they contribute to such bodies.
    The value of members is not indexed to their financial contribution.

    A good guideline is that if your expenses on any voluntary activity is over 1% of your disposable income, you should start to look closer and start thinking about cutting back.

    The most precious contribution will more likely be the time you invest, as long as that time does not interfere with other social obligations, especially family and work obligations.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... an atheist?

    Albert Cowan21-05-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.

    The reference to the "Great Architect of the Universe" (formerly the "Supreme Being" found in the French Constitution) does not necessitate the belief in a personal deity or in any deity. It does not contradict such as belief either, but it does not imply it.

    The "Great Architect of the Universe" can of course be understood to be the god(s) of any religion our members may adhere to. But it can also be "science" or "human consciousnesses", etc..

    For Freemasons, the concept of "Great Architect of the Universe" is an organizing principle rather than a dogmatic belief. Freemasonry does not offer dogmas.

  • Will a judge show leniency to me if we are both freemasons?

    Albert Cowan27-04-2013

    A judge should be impartial, and Freemasons should be law abiding.

    So your membership as a Freemason would not tilt the balance of Justice one way or the other. But if it did (it won't), it should be in the sense of more severity.

    If you are committing a crime in civil law, you have most certainly already breach your duty as a Freemason: you should not expect any help with civil proceeding, and rather expect further disciplinary action from your sisters and brethren.

    Freemasonry is not a free pass for anything.
    If anything it is more demanding of its members because of their commitment to the truth and to self-improvement for the benefit of humanity.

  • What are the advantages or privileges of being a freemason?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    None other than fraternally working towards improving yourself, be of service to your fellow women and men, and search for the truth.

    There are no financial incentive in being a member. It will not give you a job, a business advantage, or help you escape the law.

  • Is membership a secret?

    Albert Cowan27-03-2013

    No. And Yes...

    No, not for you

    No, it is not one of the "secret" of Freemasonry. You can reveal your membership to whom you want, when you want.

    It is even strongly encouraged that you let your family know. It is encouraged that you let your friends know. Because family and friends are the best counsel anyone can find.
    They can keep you in check and make sure that you do not let any activity in your life "take over"; that includes Freemasonry.
    They can also advise you when you are wondering if you should invest more time with Freemasonry, by taking more responsibilities, or if you are doing enough already as regards to your other social obligations.

    As for work, or religious groups you belong too, or other social clubs, it is up to you to decide whom to tell and when to tell them. And if someone is approaching you to ask about it, they may be interested, so feel free to share. But you are certainly not encouraged to "talk people into joining".

    Yes, for others

    Just like anything which relates to the intimate (e.g., religion, sexuality, spirituality, relationships, fantasies, dreams and hopes), there is a difference between "coming out" by yourself to people, and "being outed" by others.

    It is unacceptable to disclose someone's membership without their express and renewed consent.
    It is similar to the coming out/outing of gay people: it should not be a big deal to be "out", but it is never acceptable to "out" someone else.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... gay?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    Without entering in the debate of knowing if sexual orientation is the result of a nature or of a choice, or a combination of both, we can serenely claim that it does not matter.
    We only care about what someone does to become a better person, and sexuality in itself does not predetermine the ability to be a good person.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... not well-off?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    The cost of being a Freemason is similar to the cost of belonging to any club or organization.
    It would not cost more, or less, than belonging to an acting club or to a sports club, or to a gym.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... religious?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    Freemasonry is not a religion, or a combination of religions, nor is it a substitute for religion. It expects its members to adhere to their own faith, and it does not permit discussion on religious matters at Masonic meetings and gatherings.

    On the one hand, we do encourage our members to remain active on all the dimensions of their lives that enrich them, without trying to influence them in how they invest themselves. That includes their faith/worship of choice.
    On the other hand, we promote mutual respect between sisters/brethren and with the rest of the world. So if your way to be religious is promoting intolerance and discrimination, then you would probably not find membership to our order rewarding.

    In all cases, we do not promote any dogma over another, and topics and issues related to this area remain "at the doors" of our Order.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... a politician?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    On the one hand, we do encourage our members to remain active on all the dimensions of their lives that enrich them, without trying to influence them in how they invest themselves. That includes their involvement in the life of the city.
    On the other hand, we promote mutual respect between brethren and with the rest of the world. So if your way to be political is promoting intolerance and discrimination, then you would probably not find membership to our order rewarding.

    In all cases, we do not promote any dogma over another, and topics and issues related to this area remain "at the doors" of our Order.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... "Colored"?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds. Especially not based on racist fantasies.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    First, the term "Colored" (or "Black", or "Negro", or "Asian", or "Caucasian", or other racial/ethnic/etc. terminologies) in itself is inherited from a tradition of discrimination based on invalid scientific concepts. For instance no one is "black". Some people's skin can be various shades of brown, pink, or other... but never "black". Why then use a word referring to something else than the actual color?
    This was very smartly addressed in the film Pleasantville.

    We welcome members of all cultural and biological backgrounds, without caring for the hue of the color of their skin, and without reference to cultural bias they may suffer due to the circumstances of their births.

    We are not color-blind: we see people's true colors, and that does not include the color of their skin.

  • Can you be a freemason if you are... a woman?

    Albert Cowan26-03-2013

    Yes. We do not discriminate on any irrelevant grounds.
    Some Freemason orders may feel that their traditions warrant such discrimination, but ours feels that such discrimination is counter productive in our search for truth and self-improvement.

    We know that good people can be of any gender: male, female, cis- or trans-.

    After all, before any central Freemason organization formed in Ireland, a woman was famously initiated in Cork: the Lady Freemason, Elizabeth Aldworth, born Elizabeth Saint Leger.

  • Who can join freemasonry?

    Albert Cowan24-03-2013

    Anyone who is an adult of good character, and fosters a desire to be useful to their fellow men and women.

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